CALL FOR PAPERS & POSTERS “LAND OF STEADY INNOVATION: CONNECTICUT & THE NEW”

ASCH CALL FOR PAPERS & POSTERS

LAND OF STEADY INNOVATION: CONNECTICUT AND THE NEW”

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2016

The Association for the Study of Connecticut History (ASCH) and the History Department of Southern Connecticut State University are co-sponsoring a one-day conference on facets of Connecticut history that belie the “steady habits” tag: the rich record of Connecticut people creating, trying out, and accepting new things in the arts, education, business, social services, and other walks of life.  Our aim is to highlight not just transformative breakthroughs but a wide readiness to innovate and take risks.  Topics pertaining to the whole span of Connecticut history, from colonial to contemporary, will be welcome.

The conference to be held at Southern Connecticut State University will feature presentations in formats old and new, with plenary as well as small-group concurrent sessions.

Members and staff of historical societies, museum professionals, secondary school and college and university educators, and independent scholars are all invited to propose presentations.

ASCH especially invites students to propose posters for presentation at students-only poster sessions — an innovation the Association hopes to incorporate in many of its future conferences.

For consideration, please submit a paper title, abstract, and a short c.v.  Application deadline is August 1, 2016. Proposals should be sent to conference co-chairs: Nancy H. Steenburg, 493 Pequot Avenue, Mystic, CT 06355 or Karla Ekquest-Lechner at Naugatuck Valley Community College, Waterbury, CT or e-mailed (in MSWord format) to nancy.steenburg@uconn.edu, or Karla Ekquest-Lechner, Naugatuck Valley Community College KEkquist-lechner@nvcc.commnet.edu.

Avon Historical Society asks for help after a fire at the Derrin Farmhouse

Avon Fire, Derrin Farmhouse, May 11, 2016

Avon Fire, Derrin Farmhouse, May 11, 2016

Hello everyone,

As many of you know the c.1810 Derrin Farmhouse at 249 West Avon Road, part of the Avon Historical Society, suffered severe fire damage this past Wednesday, May 11th.  Thanks to the very quick and precise response by the Avon Volunteer Fire Department, with mutual aid from Simsbury, Canton and Farmington, the structure was saved and it is structurally sound.  The cause was deemed to be an accident – spontaneous combustion of oily stain soaked rags left in a plastic garbage pail from some volunteer work done the day before the fire.
We have set up a funding site for donations and I am asking you to consider a donation and to share this site with your contacts who might be interested in donating.  And if you are on Facebook, we would very much appreciate it if posted the site on your Facebook page letting others know of the opportunity to save this over 200 year old structure.
The site is:  www.gofundme.com/derrin.  Or donations can be made to:  Avon Historical Society, P.O. Box 448, Avon, CT 06001. Note on the memo line: Derrin House.  All contributions are tax deductible.
The past 72 hours since the fire has been a learning process for all of us.  But we have received an overwhelming amount of support from local and state organizations (even the New England Museum Association) all standing ready to help us as we go forward.  Some even arrived on scene yesterday afternoon to tour the damage and provide advice and consultation on next steps.  Those who have been through this before say that lemonade can come from lemons; we are hoping this to be the case.  And we are quickly learning that this is going to be a very long process, so we are moving carefully and deliberately to make sure we achieve our goal.

As part of background, the Society does not own the building. It is leased from the CT Department of the Military because the last family to live in it (not Derrins) were the caretakers of the First Co. Governor’s Horse Guards which is located across the street. We have had the lease since 1996 and there has been a large team of volunteers who have worked tirelessly over the past 20 years restoring the house with grants, private donations and lots and lots of donated materials.  The lease requires the Society to carry insurance, which we do. But, as you can image, no amount of insurance can replace what was lost.  So we are seeking donations to help this process move forward.  We will be updating the Society’s website tomorrow with more details, but the GoFundMe page has photos and explanation of what happened.

We had planned a grand re-opening event on June 12th  to mark the 250th anniversary of the Derrin Family signing a deed taking over the land that this house is on today.  The work being done inside was getting ready for that day of celebration with the opening of a new Visitor Center.  The Derrin family owned three houses and farms on West Avon Road from 1766 until the 1940’s.  Many of you may know the “flower house” on the same road just south of our Derrin House.  That house was also a Derrin Family house and farm.
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Thank you for considering a donation, which can be anonymous, on the funding site or via the mail.  Or, if you do not donate, but can pass on this information to others, we would very much appreciate it.
Terri Wilson
President
Avon Historical Society







Exploring Connecticut and the Slave Trade: April 21 Event

Exploring Connecticut and the Slave Trade

When: Tuesday, April 21, 12pm – 1pm
Where: Connecticut’s Old State House, 800 Main Street, Hartford, CT 06103, United States (map)
Join acclaimed writer and independent historian, Anne Farrow, as she discusses her new book, “The Logbooks Connecticut’s Slave Ships and Human Memory.” Farrow has spent the last decade exploring the content and the meaning of a set of 18th-century New London slave ships’ logbooks. Her book explores the Africa’s (a slave ship) three voyages in 1757, including a journey from New London to the tiny island of Bence in Sierra Leone to take on fresh water and slaves. These voyages, documented by the ship owner’s son, unearth new realities of Connecticut’s slave trade and question how we could have forgotten this part of our past so completely. Following Farrow’s talk, Dr. Allegra di Bonaventura, author of “For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England,” for a panel discussion moderated by the Connecticut Network’s (CT-N) Diane Smith. Following the program, there will be a book signing with Ms. Farrow and Dr. di Bonaventura. This program is co-sponsored with the Stanley Whitman House. Registration is encouraged, but not required. You can register here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/3LRNJQM
Visit the Captive People website at http://captivepeople.stanleywhitman.org